Office Signs Pro LLC :: ADA Signs

ADA Signs

“ADA Signs” are required in the US as a result of the Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA, but a lot of people think that the term “ADA Signs” is synonymous with Braille Signs, which is not the case. ADA signs have certain specifications and guidelines that ensure the signs will be visible and helpful to people with different disabilities (especially vision). Braille and raised letters are only part of the requirements, though the most visible ones, set up by the ADA Accessibility Guidelines, or ADAAG.

Read more about ADA Signs:

The ADA Guidelines are changing periodically but the principles are the same: almost every sign that would be considered an "architectural" sign must comply with one or another of the ADA Guidelines. In other words, if a sign identifies a permanent room or space of a facility, including exits, directs or informs about functional spaces of the facility, or identifies, directs to, or informs about accessible features of the facility, it must comply. Signs for advertising and marketing purposes, temporary signs, company logos and names are examples of signs or sections of signs that do not have to comply.

plastic ada
Buy Plastic ADA Signs
vista ada
Buy Vista ADA Signs

ADA Sign

The complete guidelines are delineated on the website of the United States Access Board and can be viewed at http://www.access-board.gov/. The actual standards for the signs (and most other standards used in ADA regulations and state building codes), are actually the product of the ANSI (American National Standards Institute) A117.1 Committee. This large committee is made up of a balanced group of representatives from industry, the government, disability organizations, designers, code officials, and experts. It meets in 5 year cycles to revise the last published standard. The standard is then used by the International Code Council for its model building code, and has formed the basis of the new version of the ADA Guidelines, now called the 2004 ADA/ABA and available on the website of the Access Board at http://www.access-board.gov/. The new proposal is not approved yet, but several federal agencies already adopted them.

Here are some of the points, described in simpler language (for the exact wording review the website mentioned):

  • The ADA sign should be mounted on the wall adjacent to the latch side of the door (when possible), 60” from the floor to the center-line of the sign and not more than 3” from the door.

  • Raised characters should be between 5/8” to 2” and raised at least 1/32”. The fonts (typefaces) should be sans serif or “simple” serif (for example: Helvetica Medium, Helvetica regular, Avante Garde Demi Condensed, Times Roman, Futura Bold, Futura Regular, Goudy Bold, Optima Regular and Optima Semi Bold), upper case only, having high contrast with the background.

  • Grade II Braille should be accompanying the raised letters, either below or beside them, spaced out from other tactile elements.

  • Where you are using pictogram, a verbal description should be placed directly below it. The size of the pictogram should be 6” minimum in height.
ADA Sign
ADA Sign
ADA Sign
ADA Sign
ADA Sign
ADA Sign
ADA Sign

Click here For a more complete description of ADAAG Guidelines

The following sign frames have an option of ADA lens. They can also be used with non-ADA lens, which is the default. After choosing the frame size, you will be able to change the lens to ADA lens (with raised letters and Grade 2 Braille). You will be contacted to determine the content, font and color.

Vista ADA Signs
Vista ADA Signs
23 products
Plastic ADA Signs
Plastic ADA Signs
14 products